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1/12/2020 Sermon by Becca Griffin, Brookmeade Congregational, UCC, Nashville, TN

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See also "Bayou Baptism" by lewpstudio.com

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8/11/19: Sermon Transcript on Isaiah 1 & Rock Climbing - Becca Griffin - Brookmeade Congregational UCC, Nashville, TN

“Remembering”—Brookmeade Congregational UCC, Aug. 11, 2019, Nashville, TN
Thesis: Remembering or Memory grounds us as we act in faith (the reality of what our memories give us evidence for) in the kin-dom of God




Readings for the liturgical calendar today:  
Isaiah 1:1, 10-20; Heb11:1

Words of Meditations: 
from Toni Morrison's book Beloved:
 "Love either is or it ain't; Thin love ain't love at all."
Sermon:  I’m speaking from the space of a person with limitations…in case you were doubting that...
I manage anxiety and have to know when I’m getting too excited (I can get too happy) or anxious (spinning thoughts due to certain triggers or fears)…
I am young and haven’t experienced everything…so there are certain things I do not know
I’m also speaking from the space of a person with experiences some have not had…this gives me the ability to handle certain situations from a space of familiarity…


A Story about Rock Climbing:
One of those familiar settings is rock climbing.
N…

7/15/19: Sermon: Nashville, TN, Brookmeade Congregational Church, “A Good Samaritan” - Becca Griffin

Sermon: “A Good Samaritan

Sermon based on the text from Luke 10:27-35, the story often called “the Good Samaritan” reinterpreted with  references from Miguel De La Torre (The People’s Bible), AJ Levine (Jewish Annotated New Testament), NRSV Study Bible, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and dedicated to all who suffer from injustice, prejudice, racism, deportation, being separated from parents and children and family and friends and home, to those whose voices aren’t heard, to children crying and their mothers and fathers, sisters, brothers grandmothers and grandfathers, and those busting their asses to make life accessible to all. 

I remember a time when I didn’t know what the word “subversive” meant. I confused it with the word “submissive” and I will never forget how it felt to be corrected and admit I was wrong in front of other people. May we have the courage to admit that we have been mistaken. May that courage come quickly. It can happen today: abolish ICE.

For those seeking informat…